How To Find Your Design Aesthetic

I recently shared a post on what I do for my “day job” when I’m not blogging, which is a sales position for a new home builder. In the post I included photos of our home, since it was built by the company I work for. I got so many questions on our home, decor and how to begin decorating your home. So that gave me an idea for a new series of “How to Turn A House Into Your Home!” Over the next few weeks I’ll be covering things like how to make your home feel unique, how I shop for my home, and where my design inspiration comes from. Today I am starting with how to find your design aesthetic and what to do once you find it.

One of the best ways to start to identifying your design style is to save images that capture your attention. The most obvious way to do this is by using Pinterest. I have so many different boards from “Heart of the Home” which is all kitchens, to “Outdoor Retreat” and “Great Rooms” all holding my inspiration. It didn’t take long after I started pinning to realize that I love white, classic kitchens and bright open concept rooms with neutral furnishings.

Another way to discover your design aesthetic is to tear out pages of magazines and catalogs. Save the pieces that you absolutely love. If there is a desk that catches your eye save it in a folder or on an inspiration board in your office. That way you have something to go back to. So often people get overwhelmed when it comes to making design decisions because they are afraid they won’t like it in a week. If you have been saving pieces that you love you have something to compare your selections to.

Let’s say you have been shopping for your home office over the past few weeks and you have been tearing out pictures of white desks with clean lines. Now you’re standing in a store about to purchase a dark wood desk with chunky legs and heavy metal hardware. Chances are this is not in-line with your design style. Don’t be persuaded by price or convenience. Always take the time to think about your purchases and compare them to your inspiration boards.

Another way to find your design aesthetic is to look in your closet. Chances are what is hanging in your closet is a big indicator of your interior style. If you wear bold colors and prints, you will want to incorporate pattern into your home through rugs, pillows and bright fabrics. My closet is much more neutral with the occasional floral print. I prefer to play with textures in similar colors rather than mix bold colors and patterns.

Lastly, do not let other factors influence your design preferences. There will always be trends or items at amazing discounts but that doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice your taste. I do my most productive shopping alone. I appreciate other people’s opinions but at the end of the day I have to trust my instincts and vision for my home.

Your home is a reflection of you, so it should be completely your design aesthetic. Now that you’ve found your aesthetic, it’s important to make the home personal to you and your family. Next week I’ll share some of my tips for making a house feel like your home. xo Bryn

4 thoughts on “How To Find Your Design Aesthetic

  1. Taylor

    Absolutely love this! We have been married for over a year and I am finally starting to re-decorate and really add personal touches to the house! I love seeing how others decorate and find inspiration.

    Taylor | http://www.livingtaylored.com

    Reply

  2. Katherine Swain

    Such good advice! We just moved into our new home in January and it’s hard because a lot of it is empty right now! I keep reminding myself that it’s okay to go slow in decorating because we want to ensure we have pieces we love; not just “filler” pieces. Thanks for sharing this today!

    Katherine | http://www.oneswainkycouple.com

    Reply

  3. Katie

    Your home is seriously gorgeous girl! Love this post!

    xo, Katie
    Willow and White

    Reply

  4. Bridget

    Your home is just beautiful! And, so inviting! Can’t wait for your other ‘home’ posts!

    Reply

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